Weekend Links: Indian Child Welfare Act, Cultural Appropriation, and Revenge Porn

– A 6-year-old California girl who is 1/64th Choctaw Indian has been forcibly removed from her longtime foster family and sent to live with extended family in Utah because of the Indian Child Welfare Act. The 1978 federal law was enacted to halt the practice of taking Native American children from their homes and placing them in Non-Native American families. So, in other words, a law meant to stop children being forcibly removed from their homes has resulted in a child being forcibly removed from her home. Goddammit.

An Ohio man is facing a felony charge of “disrupting public services” for creating a parody Facebook page for the Parma Police Department. A police spokesperson claimed that 27-year-old Anthony Novak’s speech went beyond constitutionally-protected satire to constitute “an actual risk to public safety.” How stupid does this guy think we are? Let’s hope whichever judge gets this case has enough sense to toss it out before the City of Parma and its joke of a police department are embarrassed any further.

– In an incident captured on video, a black female San Francisco State University student assaulted a white male student because he had dreadlocks, accusing him of “cultural appropriation.” Amazingly, some commentators are still defending the woman’s actions, including this person, who says that white people don’t have the right to style their hair however they want if it offends minorities, and that to insist otherwise is to exercise “white entitlement.” Wow.

– Andrew Wakefield, the disgraced former British physician and prominent anti-vaxxer, has condemned the Tribeca Film Festival’s decision to pull his “documentary” exploring the discredited link between the MMR vaccine and autism, claiming that his “first amendment” rights are under attack. I guess we can add freedom of speech to the list of things that Mr. Wakefield does not understand.

– And, finally, I never though this day would come, but I’m actually in agreement with the MPAA: The Motion Picture Association of American has come out against proposed revenge porn legislation in Minnesota, saying that the law as written would be broad enough to criminalize such constitutionally-protected speech as “images of Holocaust victims, or prisoners at Abu Ghraib.” I applaud the MPAA for taking such a bold stance against a well-intentioned but unconstitutional law.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s